Posts by Mark Graham

About Mark Graham

Mark Graham is the Professor of Internet Geography at the OII, a Faculty Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute, a Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, and an Associate in the University of Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment. He leads a range of research projects spanning topics between digital labour, the gig economy, internet geographies, and ICTs and development.

Networked but Commodified: The (Dis)Embeddedness of Digital Labour in the Gig Economy

I have a new article out with some colleagues: Wood, A., Graham, M., Lehdonvirta, A., and Hjorth, I. 2019. Networked but Commodified: The (Dis)Embeddedness of Digital Labour in the Gig Economy. Sociology. https://doi.org/10.1177/0038038519828906 The piece came out of a project that I led on Microwork and Virtual Production Networks in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia,… Read More »

New publication: Digital Connectivity and African Knowledge Economies

We have a new publication out that summarises some of our Geonet research to-date. You can download the full paper here, or get a free open-access version at the link below: Graham, M., Ojanpera, S., Anwar, M. A., and Friederici, N. 2017. Digital Connectivity and African Knowledge Economies. Questions de Communication. 32. 345-360. Abstract: Connectivity throughout… Read More »

Digital Control in Value Chains: Challenges of Connectivity for East African Firms

18 December 2017 0

I’m happy to report on a new co-authored paper that I have out. The piece asks what difference changing connectivity has made for East African firms. The piece emerges from a multi-year study on Development and Broadband Internet Access in East Africa that evolved into the current ‘Geonet‘ project. Foster, C., Graham, M., Mann, L., Waema, T., and… Read More »

The shape of work to come

Nature just published a published a long article about the ‘three ways that the digital revolution is reshaping workforces around the world.’ Amir Anwar and I were interviewed for it, and the article includes some of our findings from our research in Africa and Asia. You can read the full piece here: http://www.nature.com/news/the-shape-of-work-to-come-1.22839